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Well, after 22 years CBS is getting some new blood to take over “The Late Show”. As Dave put it:

David Letterman’s final show as ‘Late Show’ host reveals some interesting trends in both television and ‘Late Show’ history:

First, CBS is calling the final show Letterman’s biggest audience grabber in two decades. A reported 13.8 million people tuned in to witness another passing of the torch for late night TV. But other reports point out that not only did it fail to live up to Leno’s 14.6 million viewers, it also was not as much of a ratings success as Letterman’s first show in 1993.

Second, David kept everything light and business as usual. Goodbye’s are hard enough without it turning into a weep fest. And let’s face it, the man’s not dying–he’s just retiring. As Dave said, “Save something for my funeral.” For “Late Show” devotees, there will still be a void.

Third, Letterman’s goodbye really means goodbye. It appears we won’t find out later that Dave is just teasing (unlike a former “Tonight Show” host we won’t name…..cough cough Jay Leno). Dave’s closing words reveal the sense of finality: “Alright, that’s pretty much all I got. The only thing I have left to do, for the last time on a television program: thank you and goodnight.”

Now with Stephen Colbert taking over on Sept. 8, the show will be getting a new image. For instance, CBS wasted no time in scrapping the former ‘Late Show’ set. Colbert will bring a fresh comedic take to late night viewers as his politically satirical archetype will not be coming with him.

Removal of stage set from, Late Show David Letterman Ed Sullivan Theatre in midtown mhtn.
Removal of stage set from, Late Show David Letterman Ed Sullivan Theatre in midtown mhtn.

Letterman got his start in late night as a frequent guest on “The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson. His appearances were so popular it eventually led to a permanent guest host role.

After getting his own show on NBC, Letterman was a frontrunner to replace Johnny. But instead David Letterman became the first host of a late night talk show on CBS.

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